How can I fight DWI charges?

DWI charges can have harsh personal and financial consequences. A DWI conviction results in  the suspension of your Driver’s License and thousands of dollars in surcharges. In addition, you may have to deal with the inconveniences of a suspended Driver’s License.

If you ever find yourself in a situation where you are the subject of a DWI investigation, here are some pointers on what to do to give yourself the best chance to protect your freedom.

(1) The Traffic Stop

Most DWI arrests happen as a result of a traffic stop. The officer makes a traffic stop for what begins as a simple traffic violation.

(2) The Field Tests

The officer can use clues like the smell of alcohol, red eyes or slurred speech as an opportunity to start a DWI investigation.

(3) The Arrest

If the officer sees enough clues from the field tests, he will place you under arrest for DWI and transport you to the police station for further investigation

(4) The Breath Test

After the officer places you under arrest, he will ask for a sample your breath and blood. He will also tell you that if you refuse to give a sample of your breath or blood, your Driver’s License will get suspended.

(5) The Blood Test

After the officer places you under arrest, he will ask for a sample your breath and blood. He will also tell you that if you refuse to give a sample of your breath or blood, your Driver’s License will get suspended.

(6) The Booking Process

After the blood is drawn, the DWI investigation is complete and the officer will start the paperwork to book you in jail.

(7) Keeping your Driver's License

If you refused to give a sample of your breath or a sample of your blood, or if your blood alcohol level was over the legal limit (0.08 or higher), Texas Department of Public Safety will  automatically suspend your Driver’s License.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.